Monday, September 23, 2013

2nd Annual DSMDC Member Picnic & Beach Hunt- Long Branch NJ

BEAUTIFUL DAY LOTS OF BLUE SKY AND SUNSHINE
Many thanks to our event planners Donna and Bob Funk, to our club president Jack Giarraffa and all the volunteers who made the picnic and hunt a great success



LINED UP AND READY TO GO
                                                              Prizes For All The Hunt Winners






Grill Time

 Games





SOME OF THE BEACH HUNTERS

 

 




Wednesday, September 18, 2013

Anthropology Group Objects to TV Show 'Dig Wars'


The American Anthropological Association has written to the Travel Channel objecting to and asking for changes in the TV show "Dig Wars," in which contestants are sent to various locations with metal detectors to see if they can locate and dig up antiquities. The material they dig up is called "loot," and is evaluated for its financial value.
"Reasonable viewers watching this program may be mistakenly led to believe that such behaviors are ethically acceptable," says the letter. "On the contrary, the looting as portrayed in the show is deeply disturbing. The overall message is that this nation's cultural and historical heritage is 'loot' that is up for grabs for anyone with a metal detector and shovel. This is the wrong message to give the public, especially in an age when so many historical sites are disappearing." The association offered to identify trained archaeologists who could help the network "communicate the excitement of discovery and of history in a more responsible, ethical and engaging manner."
A spokeswoman for the Travel Channel said via e-mail that no laws are broken. She said that the competition takes place with the full permission of the owners of the land where digging take place. Further, she said that items that are excavated are either returned to the land owners or given to local museums, and she said that the channel believes that "metal detecting enthusiasts should always abide by state and federal laws." She added: "We respect the numerous opinions as it relates to the gathering and  preservation of artifacts. We welcome the dialogue, and hope that Travel Channel's programming will continue to inspire viewers to travel to new destinations to discover each location's unique history."

Photo: Travel Channel
Read more: http://www.insidehighered.com/quicktakes/2013/07/22/anthropology-group-objects-tv-show-dig-wars#ixzz2fHhPLIwK
Inside Higher Ed 

Forget Digging For Coins- Look At The Bills In Your Wallet


http://coolserialnumbers.com/default.aspx
Unusual' bills are being bought, sold and hunted on the website Cool Serial Numbers.com,  with low serial numbers, from 00000001 to 00000100, being particularly sought after, a $1 bill with the serial number 00000002 going for $2,500.

The U.S. based site lists all the different notes that collectors are looking out for and allows serial number fans to get in touch with one another.

There are categories such as 'solids' (where the digits repeat eight times), 'ladders' (12345678), 'radars' (01133110 - where the number reads the same left-to-right as right-to-left) and 'repeaters' (20012001 - the second half is the same as the first half).

A $5 bill with the number 33333333 is currently up for sale for $13,000, while a set of nine $20 bills running from 00000010 through to 00000090 can be bought for $1,800.

Friday, September 13, 2013

Directions for the Cleaning of Artifacts/Coins using Hydrogen Peroxide


Received this from Glen our Treasurer. Not sure if it works or not 

Required items:
                               
 - Disposable plastic bowl – I use an empty margarine container

 - Bottle of Hydrogen Peroxide which is 3% H2O2

- Heat Source – I have a gooseneck lamp with a halogen bulb in it.

- Box of Cotton Swabs – Q Tips are the best – others fall apart too easily

Make sure the artifact/coin is free of any oil coating like olive oil if you previous had soaked this object.  The oil coating prevents the Hydrogen Peroxide from working on the dirt.

Put object to be cleaned in disposable plastic bowl and then pour Hydrogen Peroxide on top until it is at least a half an inch above the object to be cleaned.

Using the lamp as a heater, I position the lamp to within 2-4 inches of the bowl.  This heats up the solution.  Be careful not to cause anything to melt from too much heat, use common sense for this part.  A Heat Source is NOT necessary, but it does speed up the cleaning significantly...

ADDED:  YOU CAN USE A MICROWAVE TO HEAT THE PEROXIDE UP FIRST,  BUT BE CAREFUL AND PLEASE USE A SAFE CONTAINER WITH NO METAL IN IT, PUT THE RELIC/COIN IN AFTER THE HEAT UP IN THE MICROWAVE!!!!!


If the solution is hot enough the boiling of the Peroxide should be very evident to you and should remind you of a geyser.  Once it is cooking it sprays the bubbles and smokes a little also.  This should continue for anywhere from one hour to two or three. 

Periodically remove the object if you want to check on the progress.  I usually then lay it on a napkin and take a cotton swab and start to gently rub and see how much crud is coming off the object.  It might take several hours or more to get real clean.  You might even have to repeat the entire process if the object has a lot of stubborn crud on it.

When the bubbling of the Peroxide stops the cleaning also is done.  If it needs more cleaning start over again with fresh fluid.

Keep your cotton swabs wet with the Peroxide while gently rubbing, this will prevent scratches.

When done with your cleaning, rinse the object well with water.

The first coin I did with this method did not require any rubbing whatsoever.  I believe each artifact/coin is unique in how it is cleaned.  Some did not clean up hardly at all.  If it is a corroded object, like a pitted, green Indian Head, I don’t think anything you do will help that.

My best advice is to experiment on non-valuable objects first and then move on to your better finds once you build confidence in what you are doing.

The objects may appear dried out after cleaning, if you want you can coat with a coin preservative like Blue Ribbon Coin Conditioner and Preservative or a similar product that is on the market.