Monday, September 29, 2014

' Lucky Luke' Wins Not One, But Two Metal Detectors

                                 
Our Third Annual Deep Search Metal Detecting Club picnic & beach hunt held Sunday September 27, 2014 at Seven Presidents Park in Long Branch NJ  was a huge success !

We will be posting pictures from our club picnic and hunt very soon. In the meanwhile, we are excited and yes amazed to introduce our Grand prize winner 'Lucky Luke'.





After completing one of two beach hunts, prizes were awarded to those who recovered special numbered medallions. The number on the medallions corresponded to another number preselected to a specific prize.
Well young Luke age 11 pictured on the left with his Dad Rich won a Tesoro Metal Detector.


If that were not enough, a little more than one hour later Lucas had the winning ticket for a White's Coinmaster  GT.
Needless to say Luke was all smiles and his Dad is now calling him 'Lucky Luke'

Club President Jack Giarraffa left, Luke's Dad Rich and 'Lucky Luke'

               

                                                                                



















Wednesday, September 24, 2014

Website Ranks Metal Detectors

http://www.thebestmetaldetector.com/2014-top-10-metal-detectors.html#.VCMfjFxKfFJ
You can also cast your vote for the best detector


<< Rated #1









1 Garrett AT PRO International
Whites MXT PRO
3 Minelab E-TRAC  
4 XP Deus
5 Garrett ACE 250  
Minelab CTX 3030
7 Whites Spectra V3i
8 Fisher F75
9 Garrett Euro Ace (suited for recovering deeply buried european coins & artifacts)
10 Whites Coinmaster and Whites Coinmaster

Tuesday, September 9, 2014

Retired FDNY Firefighter Returns Lost Ring Found On Beach

A Queens New York woman thought all hope was lost when her 1.3-carat engagement ring worth $13,600 went missing in the sands of Robert Moses State Park — and joked on Facebook that “some broke metal-detector dude” might pocket it.
She was half-right. There was a guy with a metal detector, but it was a retired city firefighter who did the right thing.
Erin Carrozzo, of Flushing, told The Post she was devastated when her “pride and joy” went missing along with her diamond-encrusted wedding band on Aug. 4, shortly after removing them to apply sunscreen at the beach.                                                                                               
Carrozzo frantically searched the sand, but her bling was nowhere to be found. Heartbroken, she reported the rings missing and left the beach empty-handed.
But retired FDNY firefighter Mike Cogan, 66, detected the ring two days after it was lost.
“It was absolutely spectacular,” he said. “Happy as I was, I realized the poor woman who lost this had to be devastated.”
He wrote about his “find of a lifetime” on Craigslist, but no one responded. That’s when he posted a picture of the wedding band in a Facebook post Aug. 21 that was shared a few hundred times.
Eventually, a couple of Carrozzo’s Facebook friends tagged her in the post — and she ­instantly recognized the ring.
Source: NY Post  Photos: Joe DeMaria
Read the story

Girl Finds Prehistoric Spear Point on Long Branch NJ Beach- Boy Finds 10,000 Year old Arrowhead

An 11-year-old Fair Lawn girl found a pre-historic projectile point in Long Branch NJ beach on Labor Day, less than a month after a previous discovery on Long Beach Island.
Victoria Doroshenko was collecting seashells at Seven Presidents Park in Long Branch NJ when she found what looked like a spear point made of stone.



Read her story http://www.app.com/story/news/local/eatontown-asbury-park/long-branch/2014/09/08/girl-finds-prehistoric-projectile-point-beach/15261855/ Story and photo from the Asbury Park Press

Further down the shore...
Boy finds 10,000-year-old arrowhead on beach
In August,  Noah Cordle, 10, of Virginia, found a Paleoindian projectile point in Beach Haven, estimated to be between 8,000 and 11,000 years old.

Monday, September 8, 2014

Staten Island Treasure Hunters Not Happy Campers

Blame New York City Park Restrictions for Lack of Loot

Metal-detector hobbyists say there's a reason they never make any good discoveries —the Parks Department bans them from many locations.

Read Their Story: